A new door opens: MBition GmbH

This month of June I have started a new adventure. I have joined MBition, GmbH, a 100% owned subsidiary of Daimler AG focused on …

“MBition focuses on Infotainment-Software, Navigation-Software, Cloud-Software and UI-Software. ” (extracted from the MBition website).

Automotive is one of those industries that is going through disruptive changes. I think it is a very interesting place to be right now if you are looking for some excitement.mbition_logo_color_4

Back in 2018, I did a talk at the Autonomous Vehicle Software Symposium, in Stuttgart, Germany, where I said something like this, when referring to software platforms for automotive in the autonomous driving era:

  • What the industry is doing today will not work then.
  • What the industry knows today in this field will not be enough.
  • Learning fast becomes the only suitable strategy to succeed.

Then I asked if OEMs and Tier 1s were learning fast enough. I still believe today that in general no they are not.

Will we at MBition be able to make a positive impact in the way Daimler is learning about how to design, develop, deliver and maintain a software stack that meets the current and future industry requirements, providing at the same time a premium experience to customers, developers and partners?

I will work to answer YES to that question. It will be an outstanding challenge to face during the coming months. I am very excited about it.

Thanks Gregor, Johan and the rest of the MBition crew for giving me this opportunity. A new journey begins.

I will remain in Málaga working remotely for now but visiting Berlin frequently since MBition’s office is located there.

Codethink is sponsoring Akademy 2018 and I am attending.

Back in July 2017 I wrote a blog post, published by Codethink, explaining why is a good business to support community driven FOSS events. This post is related to that one.

akademyLogo4Dot

I will be attending to Akademy 2018. It will take place in Vienna, Austria, from August 11th to 17th. I will be there representing Codethink, which is a proud sponsor of this 2018 edition.

I attend regularly to Akademy since, as most of you know, I have been an active contributor, a user of the software, a supporter of some of their activities and/or a KDE e.V. member for some time now. I learn a lot during this event, and not just about KDE related topics.

This edition has several specific points of interest to me:

  • I am involved in a project called BuildStream, a FOSS integration tool for declarative systems and applications. Currently its main user are the GNOME integration team and the Freedesktop SDK project. We would like to expand our user base among communities like KDE.
  • Freedesktop SDK are a platform and a SDK runtimes for flatpak apps and runtimes based on freedesktop modules. Several colleagues of mine are behind this project that is about to release a new version.
  • A year ago, during an Akademy BoF, some KDE contributors decided we wanted to put some effort towards enabling KDE software on automotive. This year the first modest results will be presented to the wider KDE community. I have been preaching about this move for some time now so it is exciting for me to see others involved and making progress.
  • I will attend to the KDE e.V. Annual General Assembly. KDE e.V. is the orga34f05-logo_kdenization that supports the KDE community which is an important activity.
  • I will update my working laptop from openSUSE Leap 42.3 to Leap 15, taking advantage of the presence at the event of a couple of former colleagues from the extinct openSUSE Team at SUSE, and Slimbook, the guys I bought my laptop from. Make sense, right?
  • Codethink is always looking for talent willing to move to Manchester, UK, or exceptionally, work remotely. Come talk to me if you might be interested.

It will be, as usual, a great event. See you all there.

Automotive supply chain and Open Source: a personal view

Software in automotive yesterday

The automotive industry has treated software like any other component, as part of the traditional, well structured and highly controlled supply chain. Tier-1’s has been providing software to car auto-makers for some years now and both together have done what they have could to prevent consumers or downstream players in the supply chain from manipulating it, improving it, customising it nor from adapting it. It didn’t matter if the software was Open Source or not, they have treated it as if it was proprietary, promoting locked-in practices. Only very few stakeholders with the right kind of agreement could manipulate it in a very limited way. Consumers and third parties didn’t have a say.

For a software company, there has been no life outside the traditional supply chain of any auto-maker.
Automotive yesterday
From all the reasons I’ve heard since I am involved in automotive, that justifies this situation, arguments related with security together with the safety critical nature of some systems shipped in a car are among the most popular ones.
But wait, once I buy a car, I can manipulate or even change the engine, the suspensions, the tiers, the brakes… but I can’t even dream about changing the software? Eveny if it is Open Source?

Software in automotive tomorrow

In my opinion the current way software is treated by automakers, the supply chain associated to them and the current business model around software in automotive will change dramatically. And the main reason will not be the license of the software used but the fact that the increasing amount and complexity of the software shipped with any car, together with the challenges that connectivity and privacy bring, will open up the door for new new players with new business models, Open Source business models. Those new factors will also provide current stakeholders in the supply chain the opportunity to increase their services around software. New players will challenge the current controlled and centralised environment.
I believe the software supply chain will expand beyond the purchase of the car, providing inputs at every level. Initially this will take place in a semi-controlled way, specialy by dealers, but later on software will become a major point at every stage, where there will be a wide offering of security and performance improvements, deployment of new functionality, maintenance services, customizations, integration with third party services, etc., to consumers directly by ISVs, enhancing the user experience adding more choice and adaptability to their particular use cases. The role software companies today play as providers will be substitued by a partnership relation.

In the same way that we all have a relative that “fix cars”, there are many developers out there that can put their hands on the provided software of their own vehicles. There are also many companies willing to do the same for their own fleet or somebody else’s one. A new car cost a hundred times more than a mobile and its life cycle is at least five times longer. I do not think the mobile industry will be the mirror for autmotive.
I believe that the picture will be closer to the current one in the enterprise industry, even if the journey to get there is diferent. Some automakers might remain as key stakeholders when talking about software, but not like today. 
Software in automotive tomorrow

The consumers demand for more and better services and the portability needs across the different platforms and devices (cars) in order to make business with software at scale, will increase the pressure on OEMs and Tier-1s over hardware and software standarization. That pressure might become in some cases as strong as govements regulations, I think. It will be definetly stronger that in the mobile industry. I see this as a positive factor for consumers.
Software in automotive soon
Experience shows that, if you intend to control a software ecosystem, you need to become upstream and create around your software a business model that serves as a service platform for third parties (ISVs). Maybe not even then you will be able to stay in control of what the customer is consuming. In other words, to be like Apple you need to control the hardware, develop at least the software platform and create a field for third parties to make money through “your platform”, which means at least controlling the distribution and updates. 
I do not believe automakers will be able to achieve that same level of control being only a Open Source consumers in a connected world, by restricting access to your platform to anybody but those who are part of your supply chain. not even if they become Open Source contributors. And no, the Android model does not apply to a single hardware (car) vendor.

I am obviously no guru so take all this as nothing but a personal opinion from an Open Source geek. But if you think it is feasable for an automaker to achive similar levels of control with Open Source based platforms than Google or Apple has over their ecosystems in the mobile industry, I think you are at least as crazy as you claim I am.

Automotive, what an opportunity for KDE!

During the last year I’ve focused a significant part of my effort on driving the GENIVI Development Platform, together with some Codethink colleagues and other GENIVI professionals and community members.

What is GENIVI Development Platform?

GENIVI Development Platform (GDP) is a project and an outcome.

As a project, it can be defined as the delivery side of the GENIVI Alliance. Today is a fairly standard Open Source project, done in the open following many of the most common practices any FLOSS developer would expect.

As an outcome, GDP is a Linux base distribution (Poky) derivative, built with Yocto, that integrates the software that GENIVI community (automotive professionals) develop as Open Source software.

It still a small project but the quality of the platform and the number of people involved has grown this last year significantly.

GENIVI Alliance is a consortium of +140 companies so obviously most of the overall effort is done by paid developers. Changhyeok Bae (community member) together with Tom Pollard and Robert Marshall (Jonathan Maw before him) from Codethink Ltd, constitute the maintainers team, who are responsible for the integration, testing and release of GDP.

These guys are supported by people like myself, doing coordination, marketing, documentation, IT services, infrastructure, testing and many other key tasks which provides the project a level of robustness and scalability that any serious attempt of this nature requires nowadays.

I am interested, where can I get more?

You can find more general information about the project in the following resources:


GDP-ivi9 is the current stable version although we have moved so fast this last year in terms of the software shipped, that I recommend you to try the following:

  • If you are interested in a solid base system, try GDP 11 RC2
  • If you are interested in checking the latest UI and demo applications, try GDP 11 RC3
  • If you are interested in building from scratch you own images with the latest software, do it directly to GENIVI’s rolling release, called Master for now. You can get the latest software there. It should most ly work since we put stabilization effort on it, following the openSUSE Tumbleweed mindset in this regard.

Currently GDP supports RPi2 & 3, Minnowboard MAX and Turbot, Renesas Porter and Silk and Qualcomm Dragonboard 410c. GDP ships Qt 5.6 at the moment, since it is based in Yocto 2.1…

…which makes GDP a great target for KDE software, specially for Plasma.

 

GDP and KDE

Putting the effort on having KDE well supported in Yocto would provide the project a third life, landing on an industry that is heavily investing in Open Source with a key piece of software, with no clear competitor today in the open.It would revamp the interest of many KDE developers in porting their apps to embedded/mobile environments and would bring attention to the project from Qt professionals all over the world. Currently KDE is significantly better than anything else that is open in automotive. It would just require the effort to include it and maintain it in Yocto, which is not small, and adapting Plasma a little initially, not much.GENIVI launched a Challenge Grant Program that might help to put some funding in the equation 😉

Whatever effort done to put Plasma on Yocto (so GDP) would also be picked up by GDP’s competitor, AGL UCB (Auto Grade linux Unified Code Base), the Linux Foundation automotive group Linux (again, Yocto) based distribution. So there would be at least two players for the cost of one.

It wouldn’t surprise me if Qt companies would jump in on this effort too. In order to play in the open filed today, they need to Open Source their products, which is a big risk for most of them. Playing with KDE, which is based in the technologies they are familiar with, would be simpler for them. I bet the Qt company would be heavily interested in promoting this effort. It would help to dissipate all the pushing back from the automotive industry to the current Qt license model, GPLv3 based. And it would do it in the best possible way, by providing great ready-to-use software with no competitor. I have been one year preaching about how big the opportunity currently is for KDE, but this is not the kind of challenge that can be sustained on volunteer basis, sadly, since keeping KDE up to date in the Yocto project would require a high level of commitment from KDE as a whole.

The community probably needs first a small success story and some company/corporate push before really jumping on it, I think. The support of a couple of KDE or Qt companies would catalyze the effort.GENIVI and AGL make a significant promotion effort around the world within the automotive industry, participating in forums where KDE is unknown. Many companies that currently develop close source Qt applications for automotive would be interested in KDE which would increase our potential targets for our Corporate program.

Having KDE on GDP and AGL UCB would increase the incentive of developing new applications for many of our young developers who currently do not have automotive as a “professional target“. 

Companies like LG, Renesas, Bosch, Hartman, Intel, Jaguar Land Rover, Toyota, Visteon, Fujitsu, Mitsubishi, Volvo, among many others…. are key stakeholders of GENIVI and AGL. Isn’t it this attractive enough?A success story like the one I am proposing would be yet another example of how KDE can play a key role for the Qt ecosystem. Sadly not everybody in this ecosystem understand what a great “tool” KDE can be for them. After a hit like this one, it would be undeniable.Think about the exposure, think about where we are today… Something like this would place KDE where Unity, Android (AOSP) or GNOME are not… yet. I believe this is the kind of strategic decision that would change KDE future. But also the business perspective of those companies (specially Qt ones) who would get involved.

Let’s do it now… or somebody else will.

Update(29/10/16): to find out about the state of KDE in Yocto please read the comment to this article from Samuel Stirtzel. Thanks Samuel.

Say Hi! to the new GENIVI Development Platform

On Wednesday February 17th, the GENIVI Alliance released a QEMU image of the GENIVI Demo Platform ivi9 Beta version, together with everything needed (instructions, source code, recepies, etc.) to build GDP-ivi9 with Yocto. A few weeks later, on March 8th, the first release candidate was published.
Finally, last April 19th GDP-ivi9 was published targeting QEMU, Renesas Porter and RPi2. Check the release announcement and download the different images and source code from the GDP download page.
I joined the GDP project in November 2015, leading a small team of developers from Codethink with the idea of moving GDP from a demo platform towards a collaboration platform. In summary, going from +r– to +rwx. 

What was GDP?

GENIVI Demo Platform was the compilation of middleware components developed by GENIVI integrated with Yocto or Baserock, based on poky, designed to showcase and test the work done by GENIVI’s Expert Groups.

What is GENIVI Development Platform?

At GENIVI’s 14th All Members Meeting (AMM) is was announced that GDP would change his name, from Demo Platform to Development Platform, reflecting the new spirit that has arisen during the delivery of the  GDP-ivi9 version.
The general idea will be to mature those GENIVI’s modules that were developed as proof of concepts (PoC) and provide up to date software together with a SDK, to attract developers to participate as contributors, having GDP as their number one Open Source platform for automotive.
Find further information about GENIVI Development Platform at GENIVI’s public wiki, in the GDP project pages. The name change, recently announced will be reflected in the wiki in the coming weeks. 

Coming actions

During the coming weeks, the GDP delivery team will focus on the following topics:
  • Migration from the current infrastructure to Github.
    • Confluence will remain as the project wiki and JIRA as the ticketing system. The same applies for the rest of GENIVI.
  • Add to our current targets another board: Intel Minnowboard
  • Define together with the GDP community the roadmap for the next GDP version.
  • Create a first alpha of the new version including the latest GENIVI software.
Feel free to propose enhancements or new features to GDP. The only thing you have to do is create a subtask under the ticket GDP-154, describe it and explain the benefits and potential risks/challenges. We will discuss them through the mailing list. I am looking forward of seeing Plasma 5 as part of GDP.

GENIVI 14th AMM and other events to promote GDP.

After te release of the new version, GDP maintainers and myself have been concentrated in making sure GDP was ready for  GENIVI’s 14th All Members Meeting (AMM), that took place in Paris from April 25th to 29th.
I participated as speaker in 3 sessions and my colleagues at Codethink delivered a couple of Hands on Sessions about GDE-ivi9. It has been a lot of work but a good finish line for this release cycle. We will publish the slides the coming days.
A few weeks earlier I presented the GDP project at the Embedded Linux Conference (ELC), that took place in San Diego from April 4th to 6th. It was my first time at this conference and I enjoyed it. I also participated at the Collaboration Summit, invited by AGL and the Linux Foundation. I will provide some more details about these events in a later post.
I plan to attend to QtCon to promote GDP among Qt/KDE developers and to the Automotive Linux Summit, that will take place in Japan, to spread the word about this open project for automotive. I have also confirmed my presence in June 2nd at the OpenExpo, in Madrid. It will be my first event in Spain in quite some time.

Summary

It has been a very busy 6 months but very productive. Leading a small but promising Open Source project, that might have a big influence within automotive in the future, working together with my colleagues at Codethink and GDP community members, has been very interesting. I am learning a lot about this industry…by doing.